Welcome to "Free Online Resources for Individuals and Organizations Working with Interpreters and Translators."

This dedicated space is crafted to empower both individuals and organizations engaged in collaboration with translation and interpreting professionals. Our collection encompasses a variety of guidelines meticulously curated to assist you in navigating the intricacies of language services and ensuring optimal outcomes. Whether you are an individual seeking linguistic support or an organization managing multilingual projects, these resources offer invaluable insights to enhance your engagement with translators and interpreters.

We strongly advocate for service users to thoroughly review the provided guidelines, fostering a proactive approach that ensures seamless communication and successful partnerships with language professionals.

Explore these freely available resources to elevate your interactions in the dynamic realm of translation and interpretation.

Australian Institute of Interpreters and Translators (AUSIT) has listed a range of guidelines on their website to assist individuals and organisations working with translators and interpreters, in order to obtain best outcomes. AUSIT is the national association for the translating and interpreting profession.

Centre for Culture, Ethnicity & Health (CEH) has listed a range of guidelines on their website to assist individuals and organisations working with translators and interpreters, in order to obtain best outcomes.

Migrant & Refugee Women’s Health Partnership has created this guide for Clinicians on Working with Interpreters in Healthcare Settings

The “Working with Interpreters in the Healthcare Setting” videos are a training resource for healthcare providers, interpreters, medical and interpreting students. They demonstrates best practice in communicating through interpreters and professional interpreting techniques in the medical setting. These videos are produced by 
Western Sydney Health HCIS.

These series of videos on the effect of interpreters in courts are produced by Western Sydney University and the University of New South Wales as part of a research project.